Friday, December 1, 2017

Screening of "Remember the Night" December 5 at the Daystar Center

“Holiday” Series: Remember the Night (1940)
Where: Daystar Center, 1550 S. State Street
When: December 5, 2017
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Hosted by Stephen Reginald


Remember the Night (1940) is a rarely seen holiday classic features the first screen pairing of Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray.

Stanwyck is Lee Leander, a shoplifter on trial for stealing an expensive bracelet from a jewelry store during the Christmas holidays. The judge decides to postpone her trial till after the New Year, which means Stanwyck would be spending Christmas in jail. Lawyer, John Sargent (MacMurray) takes pity on Lee and pays her bail so she doesn’t have to spend the holidays locked up. John invites Lee to his mother’s home, where he grew up, which makes a big impression on her. The warmth of Sargent’s family and the magic of the Christmas holiday make Lee take stock of her life.

Directed by the too-often-neglected Mitchell Leisen, with a script by Preston Sturges, Remember the Night features a dream of a supporting cast that includes Beulah Bondi, Elizabeth Patterson, and Sterling Holloway.



Have some Joe and Enjoy the Show!
You can bring food and beverages into the auditorium; we even have small tables set up next to some of the seats. General Admission: $5 Students and Senior Citizens: $3.

Join the Chicago Film club; join the discussion
Twice a month we screen classic films and have a brief discussion afterward. For more information, including how to join (it’s free), click here. The Venue 1550 is easily accessible by the CTA. Please visit Transit Chicago for more information on transportation options.

Stephen Reginald is a freelance writer and editor. He has worked at various positions within the publishing industry for over 25 years. Most recently he was executive editor for McGraw-Hill’s The Learning Group Division. A long-time amateur student of film, Reginald hosts “Chicago Film Club,” a monthly movie event held in the South Loop, for the past two years. Reginald has also taught several adult education film classes at Facets Film School, Chicago.

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Happy Thanksgiving!

Jeanne Crain looks lovingly at her Thanksgiving turkey!

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Screening of "Where the Sidewalk Ends" at Daystar Center November 18

“Noirvember” Series: Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950)
Where: Daystar Center, 1550 S. State Street
When: November 18, 2017
Time: 6:45 p.m.
Hosted by Stephen Reginald

Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950) reunites the star’s of Laura (1944), Dana Andrews and Gene Tierney in another classic film noir directed by Otto Preminger. The plot concerns a rogue cop, Mark Dixon (Andrews) who goes a little too far when pursuing some crooks and hoodlums. When he accidentally kills one of the suspects involved with gangster Steve Scalise (Gary Merrill), Dixon’s life begins to spiral out of control. Things become even more complicated when Dixon begins to fall in love with Morgan Taylor-Paine (Tierney) the widow of the suspect he killed. Will Dixon be able to solve the case without implicating himself? The film boast a superior supporting cast including, Karl Malden, Ruth Donnelly, and Craig Stevens.


Backstory: Dana Andrews and Gene Tierney made five movies together: Tobacco Road, Belle Starr (both 1941), Laura (1944), The Iron Curtain (1948), and Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950). Where the Sidewalk Ends was the last film that Otto Preminger made under his contract with Twentieth Century-Fox.


Have some Joe and Enjoy the Show!
You can bring food and beverages into the auditorium; we even have small tables set up next to some of the seats. General Admission: $5 Students and Senior Citizens: $3.

Join the Chicago Film club; join the discussion
Twice a month we screen classic films and have a brief discussion afterward. For more information, including how to join (it’s free), click here. The Venue 1550 is easily accessible by the CTA. Please visit Transit Chicago for more information on transportation options.

Stephen Reginald is a freelance writer and editor. He has worked at various positions within the publishing industry for over 25 years. Most recently he was executive editor for McGraw-Hill’s The Learning Group Division. A long-time amateur student of film, Reginald hosts “Chicago Film Club,” a monthly movie event held in the South Loop, for the past two years. Reginald has also taught several adult education film classes at Facets Film School, Chicago.

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Field Trip: “Casablanca” November 12 at River East 21


Join the Chicago Film Club, on Sunday November 12 at 2:00 p.m., as we enjoy viewing the 1942 classic, Casablanca on the big screen at the AMC River East 21, 322 East Illinois, Chicago, IL. If you’ve never seen the movie starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid on the big screen, you’re in for a treat.
You may buy tickets day of screening or order them in advance. Click the link to order. 

Casablanca on the big screen
Date: November 12 at River East 21
Time: 2:00 p.m.

I'll be holding a red "Meetup" sign by the concessions at theater level



Set against the backdrop of World War II, Humphrey Bogart stars as Rick Blaine, the owner of a nightclub in Vichy-controlled Casablanca, whose life changes forever when his lost love, Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman), walks into his club and back into his life. Also starring Paul Henreid and Claude Rains.

Honor and Remember our Veterans Today and Everyday

(from left to right) Actors Robert Montgomery, Clark Gable, and Robert Taylor served in the
armed forces during World War II.

Monday, October 23, 2017

Screening of "Arsenic and Old Lace" October 28 at the Daystar Center

“Halloween” Series: Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)
Where: Daystar Center, 1550 S. State Street
When: October 28, 2017
Time: 6:45 p.m.
Hosted by Stephen Reginald

Arsenic and Old Lace (1944) is the screen adaptation of the dark comedy play written by Joseph Kesselring. Director Frank Capra filmed the movie in 1941, but the film’s release was delayed until the play finished its Broadway run. The role of Mortimer Brewster was offered to Bob Hope, but his home studio (Paramount) wouldn’t release him from his contract. When Cary Grant accepted the role, it was off to the races.

Cary Grant and Priscilla Lane on the Warner Bros. lot
Mortimer Brewster is a critic and writer who has written books about marriage being old-fashioned and based on superstition. In spite of these “beliefs,” Mortimer marries Elaine Harper (Priscilla Lane), his childhood sweetheart, who lived next door to him in Brooklyn, on Halloween. After the wedding, Mortimer visits his old family home occupied by his two elderly aunts Abby (Josephine Hull) and Martha (Jean Adair) and his brother Teddy (John Alexander) who believes he is Teddy Roosevelt. When Mortimer finds a corpse in a window seat, he discovers that his kindly aunts are killing old bachelors that they presume are suffering and lonely. To complicate things further, the home is visited by Mortimer’s older brother Jonathan (Raymond Massey), a murderer looking for a place to hide the body of his latest victim.

Josephine Hull, Jean Adair and John Alexander recreated their Broadway roles, getting an eight-week leave of absence while the stage production was still running. Capra keeps the action moving at a brisk, hilarious pace that never lets up. The movie is filled with familiar character actors, including Jack Carson, Edward Everett Horton, James Gleason, and Peter Lorre.

Arsenic and Old Lace is listed at number 30 on the American Film Institute’s 100 Years…100 Laughs list, making it one of the funniest movies in American cinema.


Have some Joe and Enjoy the Show!
You can bring food and beverages into the auditorium; we even have small tables set up next to some of the seats. General Admission: $5 Students and Senior Citizens: $3.

Join the Chicago Film club; join the discussion
Twice a month we screen classic films and have a brief discussion afterward. For more information, including how to join (it’s free), click here. The Venue 1550 is easily accessible by the CTA. Please visit Transit Chicago for more information on transportation options.

Stephen Reginald is a freelance writer and editor. He has worked at various positions within the publishing industry for over 25 years. Most recently he was executive editor for McGraw-Hill’s The Learning Group Division. A long-time amateur student of film, Reginald hosts “Chicago Film Club,” a monthly movie event held in the South Loop, for the past two years. Reginald has also taught several adult education film classes at Facets Film School, Chicago.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

10 Things You May Not Know About Deborah Kerr

Deborah Kerr (1921 – 2007) is perhaps best remembered as portraying proper British ladies on the screen, but she had quite a range as an actress. She appeared in comedies, dramas, and musicals with ease.

1. Kerr first trained to be a ballet dancer.

2. Early in her career, she appeared in various walk-on parts in Shakespeare productions in London.

3. At 21 Kerr made her West End debut in Ellie Dunn, stealing the spotlight from established stage stars Edith Evans and Isabel Jeans.

4. Her career in film took off with the Michael Powell and Eric Pressburger production of The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) in which she played three women.

5. A starring role in another Powell Pressburger production, Black Narcissus (1947) brought Kerr to the attention of Hollywood.

Deborah Kerr with Burt Lancaster in From Here to Eternity, a change of pace
role for the actress

6. Kerr’s first Hollywood role was in the film The Hucksters (1947) costarring Clark Gable with the tagline “Gable’s new star is Deborah Kerr,” in part to introduce American audiences to the pronunciation of Kerr—it rhymes with star!

7. Three times Kerr played a governess in popular films: The King and I (1956), The Innocents (1961), and The Chalk Garden (1964).

8. Kerr was nominated six times for Best Actress Academy Awards, but never won; she was awarded an honorary Oscar in 1994.

9. The actress starred with good friend Robert Mitchum in three films: Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison (1957), The Sundowners and The Grass is Greener (both 1960).

10. Kerr has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1709 Vine Street.



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